The Virginia primary is one week away, but voting concerns are already starting in the Commonwealth. One Charlottesville group says the electronic machines we'll use to vote have to go.   

For David Swanson with the Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice, it's a constitutional issue. Swanson says electronic voting machines are unconstitutional because they count votes "secretly," with only the machine's software holding the real results. 

Registrars say after the 2000 presidential election, known for its butterfly ballots and hanging chads, they were mandated by federal and state law to use the electronic machines. They admit the machines have some problems, but aren't sure the alternative is any better.     

"We ought to be making some serious demands on our state legislators in Richmond and on our Congress members. We ought to require hand-counted paper ballots in every election," suggested Swanson.    

Charlottesville registrar Sheri Iachetta said, "I'm not against those. I would be the number one proponent if logistically you tell me how do we fix this...what can we do to make it better."  

There are a few bills before the General Assembly tackling the voting machine issue. Last year, they passed a bill outlawing the purchase of any more electronic voting machines.

You can expect to see those electronic machines one week from Tuesday in Virginia's primary.

Reported by Annie Scholz
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The Virginia primary is one week away, but voting concerns are already starting in the Commonwealth. One Charlottesville group says the electronic machines we'll use to vote have to go.