JURAVIN RESEARCH found "natural" or "fresh" orange juice to be very fattening, with NO HEALTH BENEFITS, and an expensive price: 250% more than other drinks.

Orange juice is 250% more expensive, it has more sugar than coke. No health benefits of vitamin C. The consumer thinks he/she is drinking healthy juice while he/she only gains weight dramatically!”
— Don Karl Juravin
ORLANDO, FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, April 19, 2019 /
/ -- The FDA permits manufacturers in the food and drink industry to list the nutrients of natural orange juice at the time of packaging. Based on the nutrition facts label, the consumer expects to have benefited from all the claimed nutrients until it’s expired.
found that while no one is lying, per se, the consumer is tricked. What fresh OJ manufacturers don’t tell you is that once you open the container, Vitamin C immediately oxidizes and vanishes.


SO, WHAT IS REALLY IN THE JUICE YOU DRINK?


Answer: Your body is gaining 10 tsp of sugar and 1 oz of fat.


How is the consumer being tricked when buying orange juice marked "natural" or "fresh"?


Answers:

1. Vitamin C vanishes to zero (100% of the 65 mg vitamin C vanishes).

2. Orange juice's levels of sugar are similar to a soda.

3. Orange juice must be pasteurized for longer shelf-life which destroys the nutrients in the process.

4. 16 oz fresh OJ has 223 calories while Coke has 186 calories.

5. Concentrated OJ has more Vitamin C than the expensive, fresh or natural OJ.

6. A tall glass of OJ has about 10 tsp of sugar and will add 1 oz of fat to your body.


250% THE COST OF OTHER DRINKS


Natural orange juice costs 2 to 3 times more than orange flavored drinks. Soft drink companies can offer a natural OJ taste and even add the artificial pulp to spare consumers from the calories and help them save money. Moreover, such flavored orange drinks are healthier than the claimed to be "fresh" or "natural" (which is NOT and will be discussed in JURAVIN RESEARCH other studies).


Moreover,
reviewed and found that added ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) to a diet orange drink is more beneficial than the natural, vanishing Vitamin C. Drink manufacturers can offer these health benefits, but as long as consumers continue to pay double or triple for "fresh" juice, why should they?


THE VITAMIN C DECEPTION


We found evidence of decreasing Vitamin C levels from bottling to the moment of the consumer’s first sip; by the expiration date, the Vitamin C has completely vanished. What fresh orange juice manufacturers don’t tell you is that once you open the container, Vitamin C immediately oxidizes and vanishes. This means that Vitamin C on the label has no more value.


The clinical trial compared the REAL available Vitamin C content of reconstituted (concentrated) frozen orange juice at preparation vs. "freshly squeezed" orange juices. The lab bought orange juice from local retailers and stored at optimal refrigeration. They analyzed the juices for reduced and oxidized Vitamin C content at the time of purchase; the lab re-analyzed 3 times per week for 4 to 5 weeks

.

found that many claim The Recommended Daily Dose of Vitamin C to be 60 mg a day while much higher volume is advised by doctors; natural orange juice labels' claims are for 100% RDA of Vitamin C in every glass.


LAB TEST: VITAMIN C REAL CONTENT AVAILABILITY


* Freshly Squeezed Orange Juice *

Initial Vitamin C: 27 to 65 mg

By expiration date: 0 to 25 mg

Vitamin C lost: 45 to 65 mg

Vanished Vitamin C: 100%


* Frozen Orange Juice *

Initial Vitamin C: 85 mg

By expiration date: 39 to 46 mg

Vitamin C lost: 40 to 47 mg

Vanished Vitamin C: up to 55%


OUR LAB RESULT CONCLUSION


Assuming that every "fresh" orange juice claims to have 60 mg of Vitamin C "in the bottle," the lab found only 27 mg on the first "freshness" date. This confirmed that 33 mg had already decomposed and oxidized (vanished) during the bottling process. Moreover, by the expiration date, there was almost no viable Vitamin C remaining.


VITAMIN C: NATURAL VS. ASCORBIC ACID


Natural and synthetic L-ascorbic acid are chemically identical There are no known differences in their biological activity. Interestingly enough, a study found that Vitamin C in a synthetic ascorbic acid form is slightly superior to the Vitamin C content in natural orange juice, based on blood levels of ascorbic acid. There is no difference based on ascorbic acid in leukocytes (white blood cells).


Therefore, the added synthetic Vitamin C to an orange flavored drink has a greater benefit than naturally occurring Vitamin C.


End of part 1 of 2 (JURAVIN RESEARCH sugar content lab test):


Part 2:
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Research by: Don Karl Juravin ( USA)

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Don Karl Juravin
JURAVIN RESEARCH
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