“Mapping CVille” project charting historical housing discrimination moves into new phase

“Mapping CVille” project charting historical housing discrimination moves into new phase

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) - A project shining a light on decades of housing discrimination is entering a new phase.

The Jefferson School African-American Heritage Center’s “Mapping Cville” project has been underway for months. Hundreds of volunteers have been combing through deeds for homes and land, looking for explicitly racist language keeping non-white people from living there.

So far, they’ve reviewed nearly 4000 deeds and found 350 properties with explicitly discriminatory language in Charlottesville from 1903 to 1933.

Project organizer Jordy Yager says while work on the project is still ongoing, he hopes it can be used to help shape policy right now.

“Now, we’re able to see those connections in a way that I think can better help inform our policy going forward,” Yager explained. "Of course, the first real big opportunity we have for that, right now, is the comprehensive plan. Within that, we have a affordable housing strategy and a rezoning attempt.”

Yager says the plan is to keep the mapping of Charlottesville going until the 1968 Fair Housing Act. Then, the project will shift gears to look for similarly racist language in Albemarle County properties.

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