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Hometown Heroes Part 2: Teacher Leads by Example, Collects Food for Those in Need

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Brown supervises a group of students who volunteer at a food pantry Brown supervises a group of students who volunteer at a food pantry
Tony Brown wears many hats at the Blue Ridge School Tony Brown wears many hats at the Blue Ridge School
GREENE COUNTY, Va. (WVIR) -

A Greene County teacher is making sure he leads his students by example.

Tony Brown balances his position as the dean of students at Blue Ridge School while also participating in a number of events and groups aimed at collecting food for those in need. This year, law firm Allen & Allen is recognizing him as one of its Hometown Heroes for all of his hard work in the community.

For a teacher, bagging groceries isn't usually a part of the job description.

But Brown goes above and beyond what's typically asked and demonstrates to his students how to help out their fellow community members.

“We all have to step up a little and do something for other people,” says Brown. “It's a pretty self-centered world, so the more we do that maybe they just become a better person."

The "they" he's referring to is his students at Blue Ridge School, where he works as not only the dean of students but also the director of the outdoor program and the head coach of the mountain biking team.

“Service should be part of a kid's education,” says Brown.

Outside the classroom, he helps organize two bike races - the Ride the Ridge and Bacon Hollar Hustle. Both benefit World Bicycle Relief and the school's food pantry, which is connected to the Buck Mountain Food Pantry.

He also supervises a group of boys who volunteer every Saturday at that pantry by helping to prep food items for families in need.

"We want them to be selfless and we want them to understand what's going on in their communities," says Brown. "Who is in need, who is not in need, if you have a little extra - what do you do with it?"

Though Allen & Allen are recognizing Brown as a Hometown Hero, he says he's really no hero and that he just wants to help kids make a difference in the world around them.

“We're giving them a very small taste of that in hopes that it sticks,” says Brown. “I guess we're planting a seed."

On Wednesday you'll hear from Dorothy Tompkins, who helps women overcome drug and alcohol addiction at the Charlottesville recovery home she founded called Georgia's Healing House.