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Kids Apply Interests to Computer Programming at CoderDojo

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800 kids are attending the CoderDojo summer session 800 kids are attending the CoderDojo summer session
Aarya Mishra is working to code pieces of music Aarya Mishra is working to code pieces of music
Students of all ages are taking part in computer programming Students of all ages are taking part in computer programming
ALBEMARLE COUNTY, Va. (WVIR) -

Hundreds of students in Albemarle County are spending their summer days back at school for another lesson.

Students of all ages are learning how to code different types of computer programming.

The CoderDojo is a summer session hosted at Aagnor-Hurt Elementary School that invited 800 kids to learn computers skills.

Some are as young as four years old and mastering coding skills that adults are currently learning in the field.

"I was kind of nervous on the first day,” says Aarya Mishra, one of the coding students at the camp.

Mishra is 9 years old and is working to code pieces of music.

"It was a little bit hard, but mostly it was fun,” says Mishra. “The hard parts were finding which notes are which."

Mishra took her love for math to the CoderDojo, where she’s now learning how to piece the subject to songs.

"So these numbers are how many seconds you want the song to stop,” says Mishra. “If you don't add the sleep it'll be one glob."

"Students are making their own virtual reality 360 tour videos and Google expeditions,” says Charlie Nolan, the president of CoderDojo. “We have students working with things like spyros or Ozobots."

The camp is hosting 800 students from across central Virginia who are spending two weeks mastering the computer skill.

"If you're using a phone, if you're using a computer, if you're driving a car, if you're turning on your air conditioning, coding is embedded in all of that,” says Nolan.

Fourteen-year-old Elijah Witt is building a small solar-powered car at the camp.

"The panels are in front, and then behind it you can see each of them are wired together,” says Witt.

He and other students say the interest in coding stems from curiosity.

"I had a solar panel at my house just from an old kit and I thought, 'let's do this,'" says Witt.

He says the skill is something every child should learn.

"I feel like all of this is kind of the future,” says Witt. “Electronics is really interesting in my opinion."

The CoderDojo wraps up next week, and several students are planning on submitting their projects to upcoming state competitions.