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Charlottesville Scholarship Program Continues to Help Students Get Higher Education

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(Left to right) Nadiya Khaydari, Mia Bostic, and Dyshe Smith (Left to right) Nadiya Khaydari, Mia Bostic, and Dyshe Smith
Joe Sabol Joe Sabol
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) -

A group in Charlottesville is continuing its promise to make sure the city's most promising scholars make it through college.

Many of this year's recipients of the Charlottesville Scholarship Program's Promise Scholars are the first in their family to reach this stage in their education. Since 2001, this scholarship endowment has helped nearly 150 students pursue higher education. It gives grants to students from low and middle-income families based on academic, leadership, and citizenship requirements.

The Promise Scholars say without this financial help they might not have had the chance to earn a degree.

“They really look highly of me, so I have to achieve everything just because I know a lot of people are watching me. So I have to do what I have to do,” said Dyshe Smith

Smith will be attending Howard University next fall, hoping it will lead her to a career in gynecology and obstetrics. She's the first in her family to go to a four-year university.

“I think this scholarship is going to, or it is helping me achieve those dreams because I don't think I would be able to go where I am going without it,” Mia Bostic said.

Bostic dreams of starting a company abroad after majoring in global development studies and minoring in entrepreneurship at the University of Virginia.

Nadiya Khaydari says her dream is just going to college: “Which I've always wanted from the first day I went to school and first learned about college,” she said.

Khaydari plans to pick up a political science degree and find time for a double minor at James Madison University.

These women join the ranks of 35 other students currently in the scholar's pipeline.

Grants start at $1,500, but increase each year scholars are in school, maintaining academic requirements. To help with this, a college navigator mentor is assigned to each student.

“The idea is we want to help them succeed, not just write a check and give them money, but help them succeed,” said program coordinator Joe Sabol.

The 10 newest recipients will be introduced at a ceremony May 26 at CitySpace in Charlottesville.

This year just over $70,000 in grants will go out to the college students.