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Activists File Counter Lawsuit Against Christopher Cantwell

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Emily Gorcenski Emily Gorcenski
Chris Cantwell (CENTER) leaving Albemarle Circuit Court (FILE IMAGE) Chris Cantwell (CENTER) leaving Albemarle Circuit Court (FILE IMAGE)
Counterprotesters around the statue of Thomas Jefferson as "alt-right" supporters march around the UVA Rotunda (FILE IMAGE) Counterprotesters around the statue of Thomas Jefferson as "alt-right" supporters march around the UVA Rotunda (FILE IMAGE)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) -

The two defendants in a lawsuit by Unite the Right participant Christopher Charles Cantwell are now fighting back with their own countersuit.

Cantwell is facing one felony count of illegal use of tear gas in connection to a Tiki-torch rally held by members and supporters of the “alt-right” at the University of Virginia on August 11, the day before the controversial rally organizer by Jason Eric Kessler.

The Radical Agenda radio host filed his lawsuit in federal court on December 28, 2017, claiming activists Emily Gorcenski and Kristopher Goad have persecuted him for crimes he did not commit. He believes that he was "framed" for the alleged incident.

Cantwell is seeking a total of $914,000 in damages from Gorcenski and Goad.

However, the two activists argue all the fallout following that Tiki-torch rally was brought upon by Cantwell himself.

Gorcenski and Goad filed a lawsuit Monday, February 12, asking Cantwell to pay $500,000 in damages.

Their countersuit says Cantwell has harassed them in person and on social media for months now and that it needs to stop.

"It's been hard, to be honest," said Gorcenski, who is a transgender woman. She says one of the worst parts of Cantwell’s lawsuit is when it refers to her as a "he" and "pretending to be a transgender woman of color.”

"I think this harassment is a way to try to hurt me, to try to intimidate me and unfortunately, I want to say I'm immune to it, but I'm not. Seeing my old name, we refer to it as a ‘dead name,’ is very painful," Gorcenski said.

Their lawsuit says an injunction is needed to prevent Cantwell from continuing his "threatening conduct."

"An injunction would be a necessary component of ensuring the safety of our clients, and ensuring broader public safety by making sure our clients are not intimidated in an effort to silence them," said attorney Pam Starsia

NBC29 reached out to Cantwell's lawyer, Elmer Woodard, for comment, and he said "I'm not going to give you anything."

Cantwell released the following statement in an email upon request for comment:

Emily Gorcenski and Kristopher Goad lied to have me prosecuted for crimes I did not commit. I deployed pepper spray in self defense against an antifa combatant, not into the crowd, and most certainly not against either of them. Their stories keep changing, and they will be held to account for their deceptions.

Goad did not want to commit to NBC29.

A new court date for this case has not been set yet.