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Volunteers Help Restore Trevilians Schoolhouse in Louisa

Posted: Updated: Sep 15, 2017 05:34 PM
Trevilians schoolhouse Trevilians schoolhouse
Volunteers with Dominion Energy Volunteers with Dominion Energy
A Volunteer with Dominion Energy A Volunteer with Dominion Energy
LOUISA COUNTY, Va. (WVIR) -

Volunteers in Louisa County are helping restore a schoolhouse from the late 19th century. About a handful of volunteers from Dominion Energy convened in Louisa Friday to help get the old Trevilians schoolhouse back in shape.

The sounds of chipping and scrapping echoed in the old schoolhouse Friday as workers from Dominion Energy worked to return the building to normalcy.

“On a day like this, it's wonderful,” says Dwayne Fisher, a volunteer with Dominion Energy. “You know, it's not raining, getting out here in the community and helping.”

Fisher says he enjoyed his day chipping away time to bring life back into the building. “It's history you know, people take pride in that you know, and I just want to be part of that myself." 

“The schoolhouse was built in 1880 in the western part of the county; it served the village of Trevilian Station,” says Chris Peterson, secretary of the Louisa County Historical Society. “It taught the first through the seventh grade.”

Education for all children was mandated during the Reconstruction Period in Virginia.  However providing public funds to support universal education was not enacted by the Virginia legislature until 1879 which is after Reconstruction formally ended in the state.  The Trevilians Schoolhouse was constructed and opened its doors the next year, 1880. 

From 1880-1922, the school accommodated 15-20 students, and during the 1930s it was a polling location for voters.

Once the schoolhouse is fully restored and finished this fall, the historical society plans to holds a dedication and open it to the community.

“We'll have it sat aside as a community venue for meetings and what have you,” says Peterson. “And we hope to engage a variety of different programs for the public school system to have young students here and see what it was like.”