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Kevin Quick Murder Case Day 17: Guilty on All Charges

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File Image: Kevin Wayne Quick File Image: Kevin Wayne Quick
The 4 defendants charged with kidnapping, murder, racketeering and robbery. The 4 defendants charged with kidnapping, murder, racketeering and robbery.
Two suspects charged with racketeering and obstruction of justice. Two suspects charged with racketeering and obstruction of justice.
ROANOKE, Va. (WVIR) -

After eight and a half hours of jury deliberations, jurors have found six people guilty of being in a gang and running a criminal conspiracy. That conspiracy included the murder of Waynesboro Reserve Police Captain Kevin Wayne Quick and a string of armed robberies.

Four defendants - Daniel Mathis, Shantai Shelton, Mersadies Shelton and Travis Bell (aka Kweli Uhuru) – are guilty on charges related to kidnapping, murder, racketeering and robbery in connection to the death of the 45-year-old officer.

"This is a perfect example of what happens when law enforcement from a number of different agencies work together to solve problems in our community,” said Ron Huber, assistant United States Attorney.

Anthony Stokes and Halisi Uhuru (aka Gert Arthur Wright) are guilty of obstruction of justice and being in a racketeering conspiracy.

All of the defendants are members of the 99 Goon Syndikate.

The prosecution argued that some of the defendants took part in robberies around central Virginia in the fall of 2013. Some of the defendants kidnapped Quick from a parking lot in Albemarle County on January 31, 2014. They withdrew money from Quick’s bank account before taking him to a rural area of Goochland County and killing him.

Defense attorneys had argued that there is no criminal conspiracy, that the gang's goals were to help the community, and that several of the prosecution's witnesses were not credible.

"They took their brothers to prison. They took three other siblings, almost an entire family in this belief, and it's just the wrong way to go. Crime does not pay,” said Rusty McGuire, special assistant United States Attorney.

The jury got the case around 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, and came back with its verdicts around 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Jurors heard from more than 50 witnesses, and saw more than 400 pieces of evidence over a period of about three weeks.

Judge Glen E. Conrad has not yet sent a date for sentencing, but it will likely be scheduled for sometime this summer.

A number of the defendants are expected to spend the rest of their lives behind bars.


Charges faced by each defendant:


U.S. Department of Justice News Release: