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Nonprofit Uses Gardening in Schools to Promote Community Involvement

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CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) -

Summer time is the perfect time to test your green thumb. A nonprofit in Charlottesville is using gardening in schools to help educate adults and children about becoming good stewards of the environment.

Tomatoes and cucumbers are just two of many items growing in schoolyards around the city. The city Schoolyard Garden Program was cleaning up at Venable Elementary school today to plant more crops.

Volunteers and coordinators pulled weeds, organized compost collections and painted new signs at the Venable garden. Six schools in the city participate in the program.

The organization promotes community engagement and aims to help kids understand more about the environment.

Garden Coordinator Jennifer Esser said, "I think it’s great for kids to just be outside, number one. They spend so much time inside and there's less and less time outside. So to be in a garden and see a cucumber growing and then pick it up and just eat it and not have to wash it or anything it, they'll remember that."

The organization will hold a free garden workshop for K through 12 on August 5.

Summer time is the perfect time to test your green thumb. A nonprofit in Charlottesville is using gardening in schools to help educate adults and children about becoming good stewards of the environment.

Tomatoes and cucumbers are just two of many items growing in schoolyards around the city. The city Schoolyard Garden Program was cleaning up at Venable Elementary school Saturday to plant more crops.

Volunteers and coordinators pulled weeds, organized compost collections and painted new signs at the Venable garden. Six schools in the city participate in the program.

The organization promotes community engagement and aims to help kids understand more about the environment.

Garden Coordinator Jennifer Esser said, "I think it’s great for kids to just be outside, number one. They spend so much time inside and there's less and less time outside. So to be in a garden and see a cucumber growing and then pick it up and just eat it and not have to wash it or anything it, they'll remember that."

The organization will hold a free garden workshop for K through 12 on August 5.

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