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Valley Bankers Participate in Day of Service - NBC29 WVIR Charlottesville, VA News, Sports and Weather

Valley Bankers Participate in Day of Service

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StellarOne employees volunteer for SWA Habitat StellarOne employees volunteer for SWA Habitat

Thursday, some bankers in the valley set aside their suits and ties for a completely different type of work. Employees at StellarOne volunteered for a day of service with the Staunton-Augusta-Waynesboro Habitat for Humanity.

In August, the bank donated a home on West Johnson Street in Staunton to Habitat. Thursday was phase two - cleaning up the property to make it ready for evaluation.

Even though they had their work cut out for them, volunteers say they're just happy to give back to the community.

"The front of the house and the back of the house were completely overgrown with bushes and shrubs and vines," said Charles Frankfurt, President of Staunton-Augusta-Waynesboro Habitat for Humanity.

Thursday, no task seemed out of reach for the nearly 20 volunteers that traded in a long day at the office for a long day of manual labor.

"As we like to say, many hands make little work," said Frankfurt.

They raked, washed windows and even dismantled the base of an old shed.

Angel Negron, senior vice president and marketing executive for StellarOne Bank, says he feels fortunate to be a part of this.

"We've been a community bank for years and we keep it in that spirit. And this is just another phase of what another community bank will do in Staunton, Waynesboro and Augusta County," Negron said.

Besides helping people start new life, Frankfurt sees a widespread ripple effect.

"It provides a stable base. It provides a place for the child to come and study and prepare themselves for their future life as well," said Frankfurt.

He says this helps improve the tax base for the city. Plus, kids that move into Habitat homes tend to do well in the classroom, too.

"StellarOne will carry the spirit going forward," said Negron.

Habitat takes over from here.

Next, a construction committee will evaluate the structure - top to bottom - and decide if it is sound enough to continue remodeling, or if they knew to build a new home entirely.

It'll be about a year before anyone can move in.

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